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Wisconsin sees influx of flu cases early in the season

The flu season has started early. According to doctors, influenza typically peaks in February. In Wisconsin, there are already seeing spikes. “There’s going to be a lot of flu out there this year,” said Dr. Jeff Pothof of University of Wisconsin Health. UW Health had 422 reported flu cases last week. The peak in 2021 was 125. That’s an increase of more than 230%.Children’s Wisconsin is also treating more children. More than 300 children in the emergency department this year compared to 178 this time last year. The increases are concerning, but Pothof said families should not worry. “I don’t know if they need to be worried, but when I see that huge increase the question I ask myself is, ‘What do I need to protect myself and my family so that we don’t all get influenza?'” Pothof said. Pothof recommends people get the flu shot, stay home if they’re sick and wash their hands frequently. He said there is no cure for the flu, but there are ways to prevent it. People can also treat symptoms at home with over-the-counter medicine and lots of fluids. If things get bad, call the doctor or go to the hospital. “With influenza or any of these respiratory viruses it’s really breathing that gets you in trouble so if you find you’re not able to get that next breath, that’s a sign that things aren’t going well for you,” Pothof said. Read more here: Pediatric viral trends in Wisconsin – Nov. 29 | Children’s Wisconsin (childrenswi.org)

The flu season has started early.

According to doctors, influenza typically peaks in February. In Wisconsin, there are already seeing spikes.

“There’s going to be a lot of flu out there this year,” said Dr. Jeff Pothof of University of Wisconsin Health.

UW Health had 422 reported flu cases last week. The peak in 2021 was 125. That’s an increase of more than 230%.

Children’s Wisconsin is also treating more children. More than 300 children in the emergency department this year compared to 178 this time last year. The increases are concerning, but Pothof said families should not worry.

“I don’t know if they need to be worried, but when I see that huge increase the question I ask myself is, ‘What do I need to protect myself and my family so that we don’t all get influenza?'” Pothof said.

Pothof recommends people get the flu shot, stay home if they’re sick and wash their hands frequently. He said there is no cure for the flu, but there are ways to prevent it.

People can also treat symptoms at home with over-the-counter medicine and lots of fluids. If things get bad, call the doctor or go to the hospital.

“With influenza or any of these respiratory viruses it’s really breathing that gets you in trouble so if you find you’re not able to get that next breath, that’s a sign that things aren’t going well for you,” Pothof said.

Read more here:

Pediatric viral trends in Wisconsin – Nov. 29 | Children’s Wisconsin (childrenswi.org)

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